Posted tagged ‘Matthew 22:29’

HMNS Continues Support of Anti-Religious Bullies

July 31, 2013

human sin makes us respond irrationally to people who are different

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement, there was a man named Jackie Robinson who broke through the “color barrier” in professional baseball. His story is beautifully portrayed in the movie, 42. It is so sad how intolerant and bigoted whites were towards blacks back then. They were so cruel, using their power, influence, and Darwinistic nonsense to bully non-whites into submission and falsely portray themselves as “superior”.

Thankfully in America today, we don’t see this extreme intolerance and hatred towards others on the same level so many non-whites experienced in the past. But Scripture reminds us that all of us are sinners (that means me, and that means you) in need of a Savior(Romans 3:23). So, until the King returns, we should not be surprised to see 21st Century humans responding with intolerance and bigotry towards those who look and think differently.  And just like intolerance toward non-whites was fueled by irrational and anti-intellectual groups wearing costumes (think “KKK”), expect the same from 21st Century groups that promote 20th Century, pre-Civil Rights intolerance.

Who am I referring to? Well, it’s the same group I posted about yesterday, who, like the KKK, are planning to come in costume to the Texas Home School Coalition’s annual convention in the Woodlands. And what are they doing there? Well, believe it or not, their purpose is to display their intolerance towards Christians who have a different opinion about dinosaur history than they do! That’s right, they’re protesting DINO HISTORY. They are intolerant of folks like me and the fact that, by God’s grace, we trust the authority of His word over the authority of men in costumes.

The atheists will be at the THSC convention this Saturday, Aug. 3. Atheist Aron Ra has encouraged them, in KKK bigotry fashion, to attend in costume ((Warning! Aron is quite the capitalist, fueling his anti-religious bigotry with “pop-up” advertisements that appear when you click on any links, plus ads to the side of the blog text).

On Sunday, the same group is planning on having an anti-religion rally disguised as an “Answers in Science” meeting at the Houston Museum of Natural Science. I’ve asked HMNS to cancel the meeting, and let this group of intolerant bullies meet elsewhere. We don’t approve of bullies in the classroom, so why does HMNS approve of them in their lecture hall? The atheist gang is certainly entitled to express their opinion and display their intolerance of others for the world to see. I just think it’s wrong for HMNS to profit off of renting intolerant bullies a place to meet.

Yesterday, Brad Levy of HMNS (713-639-4629, press “2” and ask for Brad) gave the excuse that it’s “too late in the game” to ask them to cancel. No, it’s not too late. After I tweeted my blog post to @hmns, I received a response from HMNS VP of Marketing and Communications, Latha Thomas (713-639-4712), who informed me “Organizations are permitted to rent our event space, unless we determine, at our sole discretion, that an event is reprehensible or repugnant.” I called Latha today, but she never returned my call. I am wondering if she has seen any of the comments on my blog post from yesterday? I wonder if HMNS would think any of these are “reprehensible or repugnant?”

“Enjoy your wailing and gnashing of teeth, because reality is coming to bite you HARD.”

“Religion is a mental illness.”

Or how about this from “Answers in Science” speaker Aron Ra (who is not a scientist), whose blog is subtitled: “Science doesn’t know everything. Religion doesn’t know anything.” Should that be HMNS’ new motto, too? I certainly hope not! Pray for HMNS directors to make a wise decision about all this, and see the anti-religious bullies for what they are.

Pray also for atheists like Aron Ra, who defy reason and scholarship by presenting a false battle between science and religion. In Advancement of Learning, Francis Bacon, founder of the scientific method, said that “a man cannot be too well studied in the book of God’s word or the book of God’s works.” He also said we should “Study first, the Scriptures, then nature,” and that we should be careful not to “unwisely mingle” the two together. Bacon’s foundation for connecting Scripture and nature was Matthew 22:29. It was obvious to Bacon, and it’s obvious to me and many other Christians, that there is an incredible unity and diversity between God’s word and His works, or “divinity and philosophy” as Bacon said, or “religion and science” as moderns say.

Only a fool would say there’s a conflict between science and religion. Pray that, instead of pushing intolerance and bigotry, that God would change these atheists hearts. Otherwise, the more they bully, and the more groups like HMNS continue to profit from their intolerance, the closer we’ll get to separate fountains.

How to start a homeschool science co-op

February 15, 2013

Here’s a video I made about a typical day at my homeschool co-op science classes. I hope this video will encourage others to start a homeschool co-op in their town. I hope too that it will help skeptics see that Christians are not “anti-science”. And we aren’t against having fun while we do science either!

Will the real Francis Bacon please stand up?

January 23, 2011

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Francis Bacon (1561-1626) is considered by many as the founder of the scientific method, which is basically an organized way for us humans to attempt to answer questions about the Created order. A lawyer and a statesman, his greatest passion was in finding ways to improve and extend human knowledge, and this is seen in his written works like The Advancement of Learning.

Francis Bacon wrote many things. He was also accused of many things, and a brief read of Wikipedia’s Francis Bacon Page will leave any reader confused about who Bacon really was, or wasn’t.

Something that naturalists commonly credit Bacon with and creationists accuse Bacon of is encouraging the rejection of the Bible as a tool for informing scientific pursuits. This idea stems mainly from one paragraph he wrote in Novum Organum (1620), which is Latin for “New Instrument”. When describing “idols” that cause problems for proper study of natural philosophy, Bacon lists “superstition and religion” together as two culprits.  Bacon claims that, during his time:

“some moderns….have endeavored to build a system of natural Philosophy on the first chapter of Genesis, the book of Job, and other parts of Scripture; seeking thus the dead amongst the living. And this folly is the more to be prevented and restrained, because not only fantastical Philosophy but heretical Religion spring from the absurd mixing of matters-Divine and Human. It is therefore most wise soberly to render unto faith the things that are faith’s.”

Even though Bacon’s works are in English, I must admit that I feel extremely inadequate when attempting to interpret them.  And if you are anything like me, you may need to read the above passage over several times, and even then, it may still not make any sense. What I think is pretty obvious though is that Bacon is concerned with letting science (philosophy of men) interpret Scripture.  Bacon says it is wise to “render unto faith the things that are faith’s”, and warns against the “absurd mixing of matters Divine and Human.” Notice, he doesn’t say we should never mix Divine (God’s Word) and Human (scientific observations), but rather we should avoid absurd mixtures. This is basically the same thing he said 15 years earlier in Advancement of Learning, Book I:

“A man cannot be too well studied in the book of God’s word or in the book of God’s works, divinity or philosophy…..and again, that they do not unwisely mingle or confound these learnings together.” [emphasis mine]

Again, Bacon did not say never mix things divine and human, just don’t unwisely mix them. That is a BIG difference, one statement leading down a shifty, sandy, secular fundamentalist road and the other leading down a solid, Biblically grounded path for interpreting past, present and future events.

So what was Bacon talking about when he mentioned “fantastical philosophy” and “heretic religion” (in Bacon’s day, “religion” meant Christianity) resulting from “absurd mixtures” of God’s word versus man’s word? It is difficult to say, but possibly one event he was referring to was Galileo’s recent problems with Catholic church leaders. In the early 1600’s, Galileo had reported, based on observations, that the Sun was at the center of our solar system. Church leaders said the Earth was at the center. Now, Joshua 10:12-13, Ecclesiastes 1:5, and Isaiah 38:8, all say the Sun “moves”, but make no mention of whether the Earth does or doesn’t. So why did Church leaders support a “geocentric” idea? Interestingly, geocentrism was proposed by Aristotle, and, even though he never made any actual observations of planetary motion like Galileo had, Church leaders accepted his unscientific claims over Galileo’s real observations.

Christian leaders made a big mistake in trying to apply Aristotle’s deductive conclusions to interpret Scriptures. The Scriptures do mention relative motion between Sun and Earth, and Church leaders should have encouraged the study of this relative motion. This would have avoided false conclusions, as well as providing an excuse for us sinful humans to reject God’s word. Church leaders could have simply said “we don’t know, we haven’t measured it, nor have we been to Space to verify either Galileo’s or Aristotle’s claims.”

In my book, The Exchange of Truth, I talk about Francis Bacon and his impact on science. Before I wrote the book, I did quite a bit of research on him. Here is a .pdf file of a 2005 presentation I gave on Bacon:

The Forgotten Message of Francis Bacon

From what I have learned, it is obvious Bacon had some flaws, just like any of us, but I came away with a different conclusion than some as to what Bacon’s agenda was. What I saw was a man who thought it was perfectly reasonable to mix science and religion. One of his foundational verses was Matthew 22:29, where Jesus informed the Sadducees “You are in error because you do not know the Scriptures or the power of God.” Bacon thought men should know Scripture (God’s Word) and His power (God’s Works).  This idea permeates all of Bacon’s works.

Because I have written favorably of Bacon in Exchange of Truth, while other creationists have not, I thought I should conduct some more study into the man. To do this, I used a creation research search engine developed at Bryan College called CELD.   I typed in “Francis Bacon” and was greeted by several results. I was pleased to find some recent research published by Dr. Stephen A. McKnight from the University of Florida. In the abstract to a 2007 paper, he drew a similar conclusion to mine:

“Bacon’s program for rehabilitating humanity and its relation to nature is not a secular scientific advance through which humanity gains dominion over nature and mastery of its own destiny but rather one guided by divine Providence and achieved through pious human effort.”

McKnight has also published a book, The Religious Foundations of Francis Bacon’s Thoughts, and is a contributor to The New Atlantis, a journal of technology and society titled after one of Bacon’s most famous works.

So what do you think? Should Francis Bacon be labeled the hero of secular fundamentalists and villain of Christian creationists? I say no, but you should read Bacon and decide for yourself. My suggestion is to read Francis Bacon: The Major Works. Unless you are VERY fluent in 1600’s era English, Latin and Greek, you will find yourself flipping to the notes in the back about every other sentence. I think you may conclude, as myself and others have, that Francis Bacon saw the important connection between science and Christianity, a connection that is badly severed in the 21st century, but not impossible to repair. The Bible can inform science, and thinking of it any other way results in an “absurd mixing”.